Fédération Cynologique Internationale

The Kennel Club

United Kennel Club

Briard

(Berger de Brie)

Briard

Briard


ORIGIN

:
FCI
France.

PUBLISHED

:
FCI
04.11.2008.
KC
November 2001

UTILISATION

:
FCI
Sheepdog and guard dog.

CLASSIFICATION

:
FCI
Group 1Sheepdogs and Cattledogs
Section 1Sheepdogs
With working trial

KC
Pastoral
UKC
Herding Dog

TRANSLATION

:
FCI
Jennifer Mulholland.

BRIEF HISTORICAL SUMMARY

:
FCI
Known for a long time as Chiens de Berger français de Plaine (French Lowlands Sheepdog). It was in 1809, in the Abbot Rozier’s “Complete Agricultural Course””, that the name “chien de Brie” appeared for the first time.
It was bred and selected for its herd-driving and guarding aptitudes. The French army also used it during the two world wars as, among other activities, sentinel and ambulance dog searching for the wounded in the war fields.
UKC
The Briard, known as the Chien Berger de Brie in France, the breed's country of origin, is thought to be the most ancient of the Continental Herding Breeds. Its history has been traced as far back as the twelfth century. Early in its history, it was used as a guard and watchdog. Later it was used as a herder and drover. During the two World Wars, the Briard was used as a Red Cross dog, carrying first aid equipment and locating wounded, as well as a military dog, carrying ammunition and small equipment. The Briard was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1948.

GENERAL APPEARANCE

:
FCI
The Briard is hardy, supple, muscled and well proportioned; lively and alert.
KC
Rugged appearance; supple, muscular and well proportioned.
UKC
The Briard is vigorous, alert and powerful; balanced and strong in muscle and bone, without coarseness, which allows him to exhibit the strength and agility characteristic of herding dogs. Dogs lacking these qualities are to be penalized to the degree from which they deviate from the ideal. In males, the length of the body, measured from the point of the shoulder to the point of the buttocks, is equal to or slightly more than his height at the withers. The female may be a little longer.

IMPORTANT PROPORTIONS

:
FCI

The Briard is of medium build. The length of the body, from the point of shoulder to the point of buttock, should be slightly greater that the height at withers.
The head is long 2/5th of the height at withers. The width of the skull is slightly less than ½ of the length of the head. The skull and the muzzle are of equal length.
KC
Very intelligent, gay and lively.

BEHAVIOUR / TEMPERAMENT

:
FCI
Balanced temperament, neither aggressive nor timid. The Briard should be steady and fearless.
KC
Fearless, with no trace of timidity or aggressiveness.
UKC
The Briard is endowed with spirit and initiative; exhibiting wisdom and fearlessness. He is intelligent, easily trained, faithful, gentle and obedient. The breed possesses an excellent memory and an ardent desire to please his master, retaining a high degree of ancestral instinct to guard home and master. Although reserved with strangers; he is loving and loyal to those he knows; some will display a certain independence.

HEAD

:
FCI
Strong, long, covered with hair forming beard, moustache and eyebrows slightly veiling the eyes. Seen from the side, the lines of the skull and muzzle are parallel.
KC
Skull slightly rounded and slightly longer from occiput to stop than it is wide when measured through points of cheekbones. Head is composed of two equal rectangles, occiput to stop and stop to end of nose, when viewed in profile from above. Muzzle square and very strong; any tendency to snipiness highly undesirable. Stop clearly defined. Nose large and square, always black.
UKC
The Briard's head gives the impression of length and sufficient width without being cumbersome. The preferred head length, measured from the occiput to the tip of the nose, is about 40% of the height of the dog, measured at the withers. A slightly longer head is acceptable. The head joins the neck at a right angle and is held proudly alert. When viewed from the front, in profile, or from above, the fully-coated silhouette appears to be two rectangular forms (equal in length, but differing in height and width), blending together rather abruptly. The larger rectangle is the skull, and the other forms the muzzle.

CRANIAL REGION

:

Skull

:
FCI
Strong, very slightly rounded seen from the side.
UKC
The width of the skull is slightly less than the length of the skull measured from the occiput to the stop. The occiput is prominent. The forehead is very slightly rounded. These traits are not well-defined in the fully coated head.

Stop

:
FCI
Pronounced; at equal distance from the occiput and the tip of the nose.

FACIAL REGION

:

Nose

:
FCI
Strong. The nostrils are well open. The nose is always black except in blue dogs which have either a blue or bluish nose.
UKC
The nose is square, rather than round, with well opened nostrils. It is always black.

Muzzle

:
FCI
The end of the muzzle is rather square. Muzzle strong, sufficiently broad and never pointed.
Nosebridge: Straight.
KC
Teeth very strong and white with a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. upper teeth closely overlapping lower teeth and set square to the jaws. Lips always black.
UKC
The muzzle, with mustache and beard, is somewhat wide, and terminates in a right angle. The topline of the muzzle is parallel to the topline of the skull, and the junction of the two forms a well-marked stop, which is midway between the occiput and the tip of the nose and on a level with the eyes. The lips are of medium thickness, are firm of line and fit neatly, without folds or flews at the corners. The lips are black. The head is well-covered with hair, which lies down, forming a natural part in the center. The eyebrows arch up and out in a curve that lightly veils the eyes. The hair is never so abundant that it masks the form of the head or completely covers the eyes.

Lips

:
FCI
Lips are tight fitting

Jaws/Teeth

:
FCI
Strong jaws; white teeth. Scissors bite.
UKC
A full complement of strong, white teeth meet in a scissors bite.

Eyes

:
FCI
Oval. Horizontal, well open, rather large and of dark colour. In blue dogs, paler coloured eyes are permitted.
KC
Horizontally placed, well open and rather large, not oblique. Intelligent and gentle in expression. Dark brown, eye rims always black.
UKC
The large, well-opened eyes are set well apart; the inner and outer corners being on the same level. The eyes are black or black-brown, with very dark pigment color on the rims of the eyelids, whatever the coat color. The expression is calm, frank and confident.

Ears

:
FCI
Set on high, not plastered against the head and rather short if left natural. The length of the cartilage of the uncropped ear should be equal to or slightly less than half the length of the head. The ears are always flat and covered with long hair. If cropped, in countries where this practice is not forbidden, they should be carried erect, neither divergent nor convergent.
KC
Set on high and covered with long hair. Should not lie too flat against side of head. Fairly short, length of ear being equal to or slightly less than half length of head. When dog alert ears should be lifted slightly and swing very slightly forward.
UKC
The ears are attached high, are firm at the base and have thick leather. They may be left natural or cropped. The length of the natural ear is equal to, or slightly less than one-half the length of the head; is always straight and covered with long hair. When alert, the natural ears are lifted slightly, giving a square look to the top of the skull. The cropped ears are carried upright and parallel, emphasizing the parallel lines of the head. When alert, the cropped ears face forward and are well open, with long hair failing over the opening. The cropped ears are long and broad at the base, tapering gradually to a rounded tip.

NECK

:
FCI
Muscled and springing well up from the shoulders
KC
Of good length; strong and muscular; arched, giving proud carriage of head and flowing smoothly into well placed shoulders.
UKC
The strongly muscled, well-constructed neck is of good length and is distinct from the shoulders.

BODY

:
KC
Back firm and level, chest broad, medium spring of rib, well let down, very slight slope at croup, determining set of tail. Very slightly longer in body than height at shoulder.
UKC
The chest is broad and deep. The ribs are moderately curved. The breastbone is moderately advanced in front and the brisket descends smoothly to the level of the elbows. The abdomen is moderately drawn up. The Briard is constructed with a very slight incline downward from the prominent withers to the back, which is straight, to the broad loin and the well-muscled croup, which is slightly sloped to give a well-rounded finish. The topline is strong, never swayed or roached.

Topline

:
FCI
The back is straight. The loin is short and firm.

Croup

:
FCI
Only slightly sloping, of slightly rounded shape.

Chest

:
FCI
Wide and long, well let down to the elbows ribs well sprung.

TAIL

:
FCI
Natural, carried low, it reaches at least the hock joint, without deviation, forming a slight hook like a “J”. In action, the tail may be carried at the highest in prolongation of the topline.
KC
Long, well covered with hair with upward hook at tip. Carried low but always held centrally. Bone of tail reaching at least point of hock.
UKC
A full length, well-feathered tail is carried low in repose. It forms a crook at the end which does not deviate to the right or left. At rest, the bone of the tail falls to the joint of the hock, ending a crook, which is similar to the letter "J" when viewed from the side. While gaiting, the tail is raised in a harmonious curve, never going above the level of the back, except for the crook at the end.

LIMBS

:
FCI
Well muscled with strong bone and upright.

FOREQUARTERS

:
KC
Shoulders well angulated and well laid back, forelegs well muscled, strongly boned.
UKC
The shoulder blades are long and sloping, forming a 45-degree angle with the horizontal. They are firmly attached by strong muscles and blend smoothly with the withers.

Shoulder

:
FCI
Oblique, well angulated, moderately long, fitting closely to the thoracic wall.

Elbow

:
FCI
In line with the body.

FORELEGS

:
UKC
The forelegs are powerfully muscled, with strong bone. When viewed from the front, the legs are straight and parallel to the median line of the body, and are never turned inward or outward. The distance between the front legs is equal to the distance between the rear legs. The leg structure is of utmost importance, as they determine the dog's ability to work and resistance to fatigue. When viewed from the side, the forelegs are vertical, except for the pasterns, which are very slightly inclined. Dewclaws on the forelegs may or may not be removed.

Forearm

:
FCI
Straight and muscled.

Pastern

:
FCI
Slightly sloping, seen from the side.

FEET

:
KC
Strong, turning neither in nor out, slightly rounded, about midway between cat foot and hare foot. Nails always black, pads firm and hard, toes close together. Well covered with hair.
UKC
The feet are strong and rounded, being slightly oval in shape. The nails are always black and hard. The well-developed pads are elastic, compact and covered with strong tissue. The toes are strong, well-arched and compact.

Forefeet

:
FCI
Strong, round and well in axis with the body. The nails are always black (except in blues) and the pads hard. Toes should be well knit and arched.

Hind feet

:
FCI
Strong, round. The nails are always black (except in blues) and the pads hard. Toes should be well knit.

HINDQUARTERS

:
KC
Well angulated, with hocks set not too low and turning neither in nor out, but leg below hock not quite vertical. Hindlegs, particularly thighs, well muscled. Double dewclaws set low on hindlegs of utmost importance.
UKC
The powerful hindquarters provide flexible, almost tireless movement. The pelvis slopes at a 30-degree angle from the horizontal, and forms a right angle with the femur.

Thigh

:
FCI
Muscled.

HIND LEGS

:
UKC
The legs are powerfully muscled, with strong bone. Viewed from the side, the hind legs are well-angulated, with the rear pasterns slightly inclined. The hock makes a well-marked angle. Two dewclaws are required on each rear leg. They are placed low on the leg, giving a wide base to the foot. The nail may occasionally break off completely, but the dog is not penalized for the missing nail as long as the digit is intact and present. Ideally, the dewclaws form additional functioning toes.

Hock joint

:
FCI
Not too low down and well angulated.

Rear pastern

:
FCI
Perfectly vertical, seen from behind. By tradition, the shepherds want to keep the double dewclaws. The dewclaws form thumbs, well separated and with nails, relatively close to the foot.

GAIT / MOVEMENT

:
FCI
Regular, supple, harmonious, in a manner which allows the dog to cover ground and accomplish its work with a minimum of effort and fatigue. The Briard should have a long trot with good reach and good thrust from behind.
KC
Effortless, and when dog extends himself covering a great deal of ground. Extremely supple, enabling dog to turn quickly. Strong, firm, very smooth with plenty of drive.
UKC
The well-constructed Briard has the ability to make abrupt turns, springing starts and sudden stops, all of which are required of a working sheepdog. His gait is supple and light, resembling that of a feline. The gait gives the impression that the dog is gliding along without touching the ground. Strong, flexible movement is essential to the sheepdog. The Briard's usual speed is a trot. The dog single tracks as speed increases. He will gallop if increased speed is necessitated to accomplish his work.

COAT

:

HAIR

:
FCI
Goat-like texture, dry, supple, long, with slight undercoat.
KC
Long, not less than 7 cms (2¾ ins) on body. Slightly wavy and very dry. A fine dense undercoat required all over body. Head carries hair forming a moustache, beard and eyebrows, lightly veiling eyes.
UKC
The Briard has a double coat that shows the sheen of good health. The outer coat is coarse, hard and dry and lies flat, failing naturally in long, slightly wavy locks. The hair on the shoulders is generally six inches or more in length. The undercoat is fine and tight all over the body.

COLOUR

:
FCI

Black, fawn, fawn with black overlay (slight to medium) often with mask, grey or blue.
A coat of warm fawn colour may show a lighter colour on the points and on the inclined parts of the body (fawn marked with sandy colour). Black, grey and blue coats can likewise display zones of a lighter shade. All colours may show different degrees of greying.
KC
All black, or with white hairs scattered through black coat. Fawn in all its shades, darker shades preferred. Fawns may have dark shadings on ears, muzzle, back and tail, but these shadings must blend gradually into rest of coat since any demarcation line denotes a bi-colour which is not permissible. May also be slate grey.
UKC
All uniform colors, except white, are permitted. These include black, various shades of gray, and various shades of tawny. The deeper shades of each color are the preferred. Combinations of two of these colors are permitted provided there are no marked spots, and that the transition from one color to the other is gradual and symmetrical. The only permissible white allowed are those white hairs scattered throughout the coat, or a white spot on the chest which does not exceed one inch in diameter at the root of the hair.

SIZE

:
KC
Height: dogs: 61-69 cms (24-27 ins) at withers; bitches: 58-65 cms (23-25½ ins) at withers. Slight undersize before 18 months, or slight oversize in maturity permissible.

Height at withers

:
FCI

Males 62 – 68 cm at the withers
Females 56 – 64 cm at the withers.
UKC
Height is measured at the withers. Males: 23" to 27". Bitches: 22" to 25½".

FAULTS

:
FCI
Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.
KC
Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog and on the dog’s ability to perform its traditional work.
UKC
Hind Legs: Flat croup. Too steep croup.

SERIOUS FAULTS

:
FCI

Severe faults in limbs.
Overall coat colour too light
Coat insufficient length (less than 7cm), hair soft or woolly.
UKC

Ears: A natural ear that lies flat.
Gait: Clumsy or inelegant gait.
Muzzle: Narrow or pointed muzzle. Excess flesh on the side of the head or under the eyes or temples.
Eyes: Narrow or slanted eyes.

DISQUALIFYING FAULTS

:
FCI

Aggressive or overly shy.
Stop absolutely not marked.
Nose of colour other than black or blue; presence of pink (unpigmented areas).
Overshot or undershot with loss of contact of incisors; absence of 2 lower PM4 or absence of 3 teeth or more whichever they are (except for PM1).
Eye too light (yellow), wall eye.
  • Ears curling inwards, set on too low beneath eye level, covered with short hair, naturally erect.
Tail curled up or carried vertically.
Single dewclaw or total absence of dewclaws on hindlegs.
White, brown or mahogany colour; coat of two distinct colours; white blaze, white hairs on the extremities of the limbs, fawn coat with saddle.
Size outside the limits of the standard with tolerance of +2cm or -1cm.
Fraudulent modification of the dog or evidence of such practice by use of substances or surgery.
Any dog clearly showing physical or behavioural abnormalities shall be disqualified.
UKC

(An Eliminating Fault is a Fault serious enough that it eliminates the dog from obtaining any awards in a conformation event.) All dogs and bitches under the minimum size limits.
Unilateral or bilateral cryptorchid. Viciousness or extreme shyness. Nose any other color than black. Yellow eyes. Spotted eyes. Tail nonexistent or docked. Fewer than two dewclaws on each rear leg. Albinism. White coat. Spotted coat. White spot on the chest exceeding one inch in diameter at the root of the hair.
Eyes: Yellow eyes. Spotted eyes.
Nose: Nose any color other than black.
Hind Legs: Fewer than two dewclaws on each rear leg.
Tail: Non existent or docked tail.
Color: White coat. Spotted coat. White spot on the chest exceeding one inch in diameter at the root of the hair.


Anatomical Features of the dog

N.B.:

Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.